Category Archives: Commerce

Stannard & Taylor: A Lesson from History

How the collapse of a Norwich cloth merchant through rash over-expansion and foreign adventures helped trigger the decline of the trade in Norwich “Stuffs” (fine worsted fabrics), which was further accelerated by changing technology and new materials. Philip Stannard was … Continue reading

Posted in Commerce, Textiles | Leave a comment

Of Bankers and Beer

The early part of the 18th century saw the beginning of the modern brewing industry, especially in London. Beer production took place in larger breweries using the forerunners of modern industrial methods. Aside from centralised orders by government for the … Continue reading

Posted in Commerce

The Terrors of the 18th-century German Ocean

Our correspondent at Corton has favoured us with the following melancholy account of the damage the shipping sustained by the high winds, on Tuesday and Wednesday last, near that place: ­­ The Millbank, of Lynn, John RITETRIE, master, to the … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk, Commerce, Travel

Georgian Mercantilism

Mercantilism was the main economic idea underpinning British government policy on trade from the 16th to the 18th centuries. As such, it defined the nature, direction and systems used in commerce, especially overseas trading. It also lay behind Britain’s almost … Continue reading

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The Eighteenth-Century Attorney

“He did not care to speak ill of anyone behind his back, but he believed the gentleman was an attorney.” (A comment on an absent friend by Dr Johnson in 1770, as reported by Boswell) The term ‘attorney’ in the … Continue reading

Posted in Commerce, Georgian Society

More about East Anglia’s Georgian Beach Companies

Beach companies were established all along the Norfolk and Suffolk coasts from the late eighteenth century into the nineteenth. Some of the larger and busier ports, like Yarmouth, had several. Caister had a beach company from at least the 1790s, … Continue reading

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Mahogany: An Eighteenth-century Wood

The use of mahogany in domestic furniture became so ubiquitous in the 19th and early 20th centuries that it’s something of a surprise to discover that the wood was virtually unknown in Britain before the start of the eighteenth century. … Continue reading

Posted in Commerce, Georgian Society | 6 Comments