Category Archives: Georgian Society

Georgian Courtship

In modern times, choosing a partner is seen as primarily a matter for the two persons concerned; a decision based on individual feelings of desire, affection and love. Not so in the eighteenth century. That’s not to say that none … Continue reading

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Fox-hunting in Georgian Days

“Mr. Peter Delme’s Hounds on the Hampshire Downs”, by James Seymour, 1738. “Fox-hunting as we know it,” the social historian Roy Porter wrote, “was a Georgian invention.” He was, of course, referring to people on horseback, with a pack of … Continue reading

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Georgian Workers in Wood

In the eighteenth century, not all craftsmen were equal. There was a definite hierarchy amongst them, based on a number of different factors: the amount of skill or artistry required to do the work, the nature of the materials used … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 4 Comments

The Eighteenth-Century Attorney

“He did not care to speak ill of anyone behind his back, but he believed the gentleman was an attorney.” (A comment on an absent friend by Dr Johnson in 1770, as reported by Boswell) The term ‘attorney’ in the … Continue reading

Posted in Commerce, Georgian Society

The Intrepid John Money

John Money was born in Trowse Newton, near Norwich, probably in 1741. Some accounts say 1752, but I think this is almost certainly wrong, since it would require him to begin his career in the regular army at the age … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society, Travel | 2 Comments

“Cunning Folk”: Witchcraft, Healing and Superstition

It’s easy to forget that “Cunning Folk” had been a normal part of society from the Middle Ages and continued right through until the start of the 20th century. They included men and women, some practising as healers, some as … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society, Medicine & Science | 9 Comments

The Murderous Georgian Rector of Wiveton

At around 11:15 pm on April 7, 1779, the audience began to leave the Covent Garden Theatre after a performance of a popular comic opera called “Love in a Village”. It was a warm night for early spring, and the … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk, Crime, Georgian Society | 2 Comments