Category Archives: Georgian Society

‘Party’ in 18th-century English politics

In our own times, most of us are familiar with partisan, party-based politics. That makes it all too easy for us to transfer our own experience with political parties into the political environment of the 18th-century. From all I have … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society, Politics, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

“The Trouble with Servants …”

It’s easy to look back on the eighteenth century and imagine how wonderful it must have been to have a small army of servants to do all the work — at least if you were a member of the upper … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 1 Comment

The Case of the Amorous Footman

This is a taster for my next article about the problems of managing servants in the 18th-century, with particular reference to the diaries of Gertrude Savile. It focuses on events in July, 1756, and concerns her footman, John Barlow, and … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 4 Comments

“Naming and Shaming” in Georgian Newspapers

In Georgian times, as today, not all marriages were happy — or even tolerable. Wives ran away. Husbands absconded and deserted their families. Injured parties craved revenge. The discovery that advertisements could be used to publicly “name and shame” the … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 2 Comments

The True Nature and Business of Cunning-Folk

I’ve been reading and thinking a good deal about 18th century Cunning-Folk. The first discovery I’ve made is simple: I knew a great deal less about who Cunning-Folk were and what they did than I thought I knew. What made … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 9 Comments

A Frightening and Inexplicable World

One of the hardest mental exercises for any writer of historical novels is to forget much of what you know about how this world of ours works. It’s true that the Georgian period marked the very beginning of a scientific … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 2 Comments

The Terrors of the 18th-century German Ocean

Our correspondent at Corton has favoured us with the following melancholy account of the damage the shipping sustained by the high winds, on Tuesday and Wednesday last, near that place: ­­ The Millbank, of Lynn, John RITETRIE, master, to the … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk, Commerce, Travel