Author Archives: William Savage

About William Savage

Independent researcher and author of mystery stories set in Georgian Norfolk.

The Georgian Clergy (Part 2)

Part one of this series dealt with the distinctions between the various categories of clergy and the sources of their income. In this one, I’m going to try to look more closely at the Sunday-to-Sunday aspects of the Anglican Church … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 3 Comments

The (Forgotten) Georgian Origins of Pantomime

Today, pantomimes are flashy, high audience-participation entertainments for families and children, performed in the run-up to Christmas. Most follow more-or-less traditional storylines: Jack and the Beanstalk, Cinderella, Dick Whittington, Robinson Crusoe. The principal male character is always played by an … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Georgian Agricultural Labour: “Men as Machines”

During the eighteenth century, England’s agricultural lands and economy changed from yeoman and peasant subsistence farming to something not too different from what is with us today: professional, commercial, market-oriented production, relying on sufficient inputs of capital to sustain ever-increasing … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture, C18th Norfolk, Georgian Society

Georgian Mercantilism

Mercantilism was the main economic idea underpinning British government policy on trade from the 16th to the 18th centuries. As such, it defined the nature, direction and systems used in commerce, especially overseas trading. It also lay behind Britain’s almost … Continue reading

Posted in Commerce | 1 Comment

William Savage, Georgian Musician

Recently, entirely by chance, I discovered the existence of my Georgian namesake, William Savage, who turned out to be a distinguished musician, noted singer, capable composer and long-term friend of the great George Frederick Handel himself. Indeed, William Savage took … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Discovering “The Picturesque”

For many decades during the 17th and 18th centuries, young upper-class men (and some women) had undertaken a “Grand Tour” of Europe (principally Italy) to acquire ‘polish’ and gain first-hand experience of the glories of Rome as revealed in its … Continue reading

Posted in Fashion, Leisure | 1 Comment

The Georgian Clergy (Part 1)

It’s easy to assume that the whole gamut of Georgian clergymen were like either the oily Mr Collins, in Pride and Prejudice, or Rev. Gilbert White, happily recording his nature observations in Selborne — basically fairly prosperous and on at … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society | 5 Comments