Author Archives: William Savage

About William Savage

Independent researcher and author of mystery stories set in Georgian Norfolk.

Uses and Abuses of the Press Gang

The purpose of the Impress Service, as the Press Gang was called officially, was to secure the men needed to keep the Royal Navy’s ships at proper fighting strength. Given the conditions on board, and the chances of dying from … Continue reading

Posted in Keeping the Peace, Military | Leave a comment

Georgian Ghosts

With Halloween approaching, I thought it might be interesting to look at the rise of the ghost story in Georgian England. The nineteenth century marked the summit of popular interest in ghosts and spirits, thanks to the advent of photography. … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk | 4 Comments

“If You Want A Job Done Properly …”

Turning once again to the pages of the Ipswich Journal for April 15th, 1721, we find this fascinating report of a criminal trial held in Edinburgh, at which one James Campbell of Burbank, “late of the Stores in Edinburgh Castle”, … Continue reading

Posted in Crime

“Great Cry and Little Wooll …”

One of the joys of looking through editions of early eighteenth-century newspapers is finding the unexpected. Only last week, I was browsing through the pages of the Ipswich Journal for April 15th, 1721, when I came across this gem: the … Continue reading

Posted in Theatre, Tid-bits | 2 Comments

Georgian Household Goods

Much of what we can see today of the contents of a Georgian house is based on the largest and grandest properties of the time, since those are the ones preserved. It’s also inevitable that much of what was there … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society

A Personal View of the Gordon Riots

Laetitia Hawkins (1760–1835) was the daughter of a wealthy London lawyer and magistrate. She never married, living with her bachelor brother in Twickenham after both her parents had died. Some while ago, I discovered a book, published in 1926, which … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society, Politics | 3 Comments

Melancholy and the Romantic Movement

How did the concept of melancholy came to be seen as especially associated with Romanticism and creativity in the arts? In the 18th century, the concept of sensibility—a refined feeling of emotion and delicacy of perception—was synonymous with social refinement … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian Society, Medicine & Science