Category Archives: C18th Norfolk

Georgian Booksellers in Norwich

Those of you who have read my “Ashmole Foxe” series of historical mysteries will know that Mr Foxe is a bookseller in the city of Norwich during the 1760s. Nothing about him is inauthentic to the period, so far as … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk, Georgian Society | 5 Comments

Cat Epitaphs

From the middle of the century, epitaphs for pet cats, usually in the form of poems, begin to appear in various newspapers and magazines. Here are some lines from one published anonymously in the London Magazine of 1733, obviously by a … Continue reading

Posted in Textiles, Tid-bits | 7 Comments

Norfolk “Navigations”

Britain’s economy and population grew rapidly during the eighteenth century, accelerating as the century progressed. There was a tendency both for population and industry to become clustered in specific locations; firstly around suitable supplies of water for waterpower, then close … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk | 3 Comments

John Money: Despair and Rescue

We left Major John Money, the balloonist, on Saturday, July 23rd, 1785, up to his waist in water and convinced it was only a matter of time before his balloon sank and he would be drowned. At first, he seemed … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk, Tid-bits | 4 Comments

John Money Aloft

In the first instalment of balloonist Major John Money’s story, I dealt with the background and the arrangements made in Norwich for the balloon to take off. You will recall, that Money was to have gone up with two other … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk, Tid-bits

Living Conditions for the Georgian Rural Poor

Most of us assume that the rural poor in the 18th-century lived in cottages. But what is a cottage? Is it simply a small dwelling house, maybe with a single room? Is it a small house that stands by itself, … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture, C18th Norfolk | 4 Comments

Dangerous Driving in Georgian Norfolk

Today’s traffic may seem horrific, especially at busy times, but at least the cars, however badly driven, have *brakes*. Pending ‘driverless cars’, they also lack minds of their own, unlike horses. In Georgian times, the press of horses, carts, carriages … Continue reading

Posted in C18th Norfolk | 1 Comment